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Tim Watkins

Wrong for a different reason

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez – A well-meaning but not particularly bright left-leaning US politician – made a stir earlier this week by wearing a figure-hugging dress emblazoned with the slogan “Tax the Rich” to the prestigious 2021 Met Gala.  Since the slogan was clearly political, it wasn’t long before the various political …

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Can this leopard change its spots?

Perhaps the most contentious – and least asked – question about industrial civilisation concerns its origins.  Why, of all the potential places in the world, should a small group of islands in the northeast Atlantic have emerged as the cradle of industrialisation?  Many possible reasons have been put forward, including: …

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Labour don’t have to win for the Tories to lose

There are those who mistake Boris Johnson’s “Bojo the Clown” façade for the man himself.  But nobody gets to rise to the rank of Prime Minister without a degree of cunning and ruthlessness.  Nevertheless, Johnson does stand out as something of a chancer who, thus far at least, has won …

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A problem shared is a problem doubled

At seven minutes to five on the afternoon of 9 August 2019, a lightening strike caused the loss of 150MW of distributed power (i.e., a large number of small wind, diesel and solar generators) from the National Grid.  This sudden loss triggered the safety system on the giant Hornsea wind …

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This isn’t going to work

If an energy policy sounds too good to be true, that is usually because it is.  Take, for example, just one of the jigsaw pieces in current policy for reaching net zero by 2050: electric car batteries.  Jillian Ambrose – who should know better – at the Guardian reports this …

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Cultural Appropriation of sorts

Welsh Government ministers and officials so enjoyed their time in France this summer that they’ve decided to import some contemporary French culture of their own.  That, at least, is one conclusion we might draw from the recent consultation on introducing selective road tolls on two of Wales’s main arterial roads …

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Who determines prices?

One of the consequences of the response to the pandemic and the disruption from Brexit is that labour shortages are appearing across the low-paid sectors of the economy.  So much so that even the metropolitan liberal Guardian has begun to wonder whether the benefits of higher wages for the low-paid …

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A matter of fortune

It is surely bad luck that Extinction Rebellion’s week of protests leading up to the August bank holiday was overtaken by the worst military defeat of a global empire at the hands of tribesmen since the Battle of Isandlwana in 1879.  With the media focused on the cack-handed American withdrawal …

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Exergy-driven crisis

Media has little in the way of memory and the rest of us struggle to remember much of what happened more than a week ago.  And so, the narratives we use in an attempt to make sense of the rapidly changing world we are living in, tend to revolve around …

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Technocracy exposed

You can tell a lot about someone’s politics by the way in which they quote Michael Gove.  Anti-democratic supporters of technocracy tend only to repeat the first part of what Gove said on the eve of the Brexit referendum: “I think the people in this country have had enough of …

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